Category

Lead Abatement

Phase Three in Lead Abatement: Clean up thoroughly

By | Lead Abatement

Making a room lead-safe involves dealing with not only the paint prep mess, but also any lead dust that might have collected on floors, sills and other areas before you started. The washing and wiping process isnt as much extra hassle as you might think, because youd have to clean dust off the woodwork and walls before painting anyway. But for lead paint, the technique is more rigorous, so well describe it in detail as well as illustrate it in Photos 10 through 16. Begin by vacuuming paint chips and other debris with the HEPA vac (Photo 10). Gunk sticks…

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Lead Abatement

By | Lead Abatement

Who should follow these procedures? If you live in a home built before 1978, we recommend following these procedures when disturbing paint for remodeling, repainting or making repairs unless you know that the surfaces dont contain lead. Most homes built before 1950 contain lead paint. If your home was built between 1950 and 1978, it may or may not contain lead paint. The best way to check the surfaces you plan to disturb is with a lab analysis of paint chips. A public health center will tell you how to collect samples and where to send them. The chemical lead…

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Phase One Lead Abatement: Control the dust

By | Lead Abatement

Six-mil polyethylene (poly) plastic and duct tape are a remodelers best friends when it comes to catching and controlling dust. Meticulous use of them at this stage greatly simplifies cleanup later. Spread poly over the floor and completely seal the edges with duct tape (Photo 1), especially if you have wall-to-wall carpet. Once lead dust gets into carpet, its virtually impossible to get out. If youre working in a small area, say around a single window, poly and tape an area at least 5 ft. beyond the edges of your work zone. Remove area rugs and as much furniture as…

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Lead Poisoning

By | Lead Abatement

Lead poisoning is a serious health problem, especially for kids age 6 and younger, and the primary source of that lead is dust from deteriorating lead paint. But if you live in a house with lead paint, the problem doesnt have to paralyze your remodeling plans or make you wish you lived somewhere else. Lead poisoning occurs primarily in homes built before 1978, the year that lead was banned from residential paints. Its caused by paint thats flaking, peeling, chipping and chalking, or by dust from a remodeling project. But if you follow a few commonsense steps, you can control…

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Do I need Lead Abatement?

By | Lead Abatement

Lead paint is serious business. The first steps are always lead inspection and lead risk assessment. The next step is deciding how to manage lead paint and lead hazards. Lead abatement is an option to remedy the lead paint issue. Lead abatement is designed to permanently eliminate lead paint hazards. You have a few options when it comes to lead abatement Encapsulation, which is often the easiest and most affordable method. Encapsulation involves brushing or rolling on specially made paint like coating which creates a watertight bond and seals in the lead-based paint. However, this option may wear off coating…

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Remodeling or Renovating a Home with Lead-Based Paint

By | Lead Abatement

If not conducted properly, certain types of renovations can release lead from paint and dust into the air. Many houses and apartments built before 1978 have paint that contains lead (called lead-based paint). Lead from paint, chips, and dust can pose serious health hazards if not taken care of properly. Federal law requires that contractors provide lead information to residents before renovating a pre-1978 housing: Pre-Renovation Education Program (PRE) RENOVATORS have to give you a pamphlet titled Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home, before starting work. More information on the Pre-Renovation Education Program. Take precautions before your contractor…

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Lead Paint information and Lead abatement

By | Lead Abatement

Lead from paint chips, which you can see, and lead dust, which you can’t always see, can be serious hazards. Sometimes lead abatement is necessary. Peeling, chipping, chalking, or cracking lead-based paint is a hazard and needs immediate attention. Lead-based paint may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear-and-tear. These areas include: Windows and window sills. Doors and door frames. Stairs, railings, and banisters. Porches and fences. Note: Lead-based paint that is in good condition is usually not a hazard. Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is…

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