Meth Contaminated Property

By | Meth Removal

California Real Estate (Property) law holds property owners and landlords responsible for providing notification to tenants and future owners of any hazards existing on a property offered for lease or sale. One of these hazards can be chemical contamination due to a clandestine Methamphetamine (Meth) laboratory. Clandestine drug laboratories can be found in all sections of LA County. Effective January 1, 2006, a new law that deals with Meth labs went into effect. The Methamphetamine Contaminated Property Act of 2005 requires the clean up of the property so it can be safe for occupancy and imposes fines on the seller…

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Maintain Your Homes Condition

By | Lead Abatement

It is very important to care for the lead-painted surfaces in your home. Lead-based paint in good condition is usually not harmful. If your home was built before 1978: Regularly check your home for chipping, peeling, or deteriorating paint, and address issues promptly without excessive sanding. If you must sand, sand the minimum area needed, wet the area first, and clean up thoroughly. Regularly check all painted areas that rub together or get lots of wear, like windows, doors, and stairways, for any signs of deterioration. Regularly check for paint chips or dust if you see some, remove carefully with…

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Check your home for Lead

By | Lead Abatement

If your home was built before 1978, have your home tested for lead and learn about potential lead hazards. Fix any hazards that you may have. You can get your home checked in one or both of the following ways: A paint inspection Tells you the lead content of every different type of painted surface in your home, but does not tell you if the paint is a hazard or how to deal with it. This is most appropriate when you are buying a home or signing a lease, before you renovate, and to help you determine how to maintain…

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Sources of Lead in your Home: Folk Remedies

By | Lead Abatement

Some folk remedies that contain lead, such as “greta” and azarcon, are used to treat an upset stomach. Some folk remedies for morning sickness, including “nzu”, “poto” and “calabash chalk,” contain dangerous levels of lead and other chemicals. Consuming even small amounts of lead can be harmful. Lead poisoning from folk remedies can cause serious and irreversible illness.

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Protect Your Children Where They Learn and Play

By | Lead Abatement

Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. Learn what you can do to stop children from coming into contact with lead before they are harmed. Test Your Child Find out if your child has elevated levels of lead in his or her blood. Because lead poisoning often occurs with no obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. You can test your child for lead poisoning by asking your pediatrician to do a simple blood test. Children with elevated blood lead levels can have serious health effects. If you know your child has lead poisoning, talk to your pediatrician and local health agency about…

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Sources of Lead in your Home: Jobs and Hobbies

By | Lead Abatement

You could bring lead home on your hands or clothes, or contaminate your home directly if you: Work with lead and/or lead-based paint (for example, renovation and painting, mining, smelting, battery recycling, refinishing old furniture, autobody, shooting ranges); or Have a hobby that uses lead (for example, hunting, fishing, stained glass, stock cars, making pottery). Lead can be found in shot, fishing sinkers and jigs, came and solder used in stained glass, weights used in stock cars, dyes and glazes used in pottery, and many other places. If you have a job or hobby where you may come into contact…

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Sources of Lead in your Home: Drinking Water

By | Lead Abatement

Lead can enter drinking water through corrosion of plumbing materials, especially where the water has high acidity or low mineral content that corrodes pipes and fixtures. Homes built before 1986 are more likely to have lead pipes, fixtures and solder. However, new homes are also at risk: even legally “lead-free” plumbing may contain up to eight percent lead. Beginning January 2014, changes to the Safe Drinking Water Act further reduced the maximum allowable lead content of pipes, pipe fittings, plumbing fittings, and fixtures to 0.25 percent. The most common problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass faucets and fixtures with…

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Test Your Home’s Drinking Water

By | Lead Abatement

Testing your home’s drinking water is the only way to confirm if lead is present. Most water systems test for lead at a certain number of homes as a regular part of water monitoring. These tests give a system-wide picture of whether or not corrosion is being controlled but do not reflect conditions at each home served by that water system. Since each home has different plumbing pipes and materials, test results are likely to be different for each home. You may want to test your water if: Your home has lead pipes (lead is a dull gray metal that…

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Sources of Lead at Home: Products

By | Lead Abatement

Lead can be found in many products: Painted toys, furniture and toy jewelry – That favorite dump truck or rocking chair handed down in the family, antique doll furniture, or toy jewelry could contain lead-based paint or contain lead in the material it is made from. Biting or swallowing toys or toy jewelry that contain lead can cause a child to suffer from lead poisoning. Cosmetics –Visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administrations web site to read questions and answers on lipstick and lead. Food or liquid containers – Food and liquids stored or served in lead crystal or lead-glazed…

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Sources of Lead at Home: Dust

By | Lead Abatement

Lead in household dust results from indoor sources such as old lead paint on surfaces that are frequently in motion or bump or rub together (such as window frames), deteriorating old lead paint on any surface, home repair activities, tracking lead contaminated soil from the outdoors into the indoor environment, or even from lead dust on clothing worn at a job site. Even in well-maintained homes, lead dust can form when lead-based paint is scraped, sanded or heated during home repair activities. Lead paint chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can…

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